27th August 2018

Nordisk Telemark 1 LW Tent Review

Nordisk Telemark 1 LW Tent Review: Lightweight tents, they’re always a compromise, they have to sacrifice something. Durability, stability or space? For years I’ve used a Terra Nova Laser Comp when I’ve been camping on Mountain Leader expeditions and it was always a love hate relationship! They’re both priced around £300, but how does the Nordisk Telemark compare?

nordisk telemark lightweight tent

Photo from the Nordisk website

Firstly, what did I like & not like about the Laser? I liked it’s lightness, it’s sub 1kg and packs nice and small, I’ve also been pleasantly surprised by it’s durability the only things that didn’t last were the guy lines, they all snapped over the years, but I’ll take that! What I don’t like… being slapped in the face by the inner fabric all night long. The inner is very narrow at the ends and I’m very tall, this was a constant source of annoyance. The actual tent proved to be pretty stable in bad weather, but like most one pole tents, it is a bit flappy in windy weather – although I added two guy lines at each end which helped massively. I also did not like Terra Nova’s laziness at not putting those guy lines on themselves, or bothering to put pull tags on the zips and would one pocket inside have been too much to ask for?

How does the Nordisk compare? Well it’s lighter, at 830grams (before I added a couple of guy lines and a couple more pegs) and packs a touch smaller even though it’s actually a little bigger in terms of footprint (a touch lower though 86cm v 95cm of the Laser). It’s similarly flappy in the wind but it has wider ends so, hallelujah, I don’t get slapped in the face like I do in the Terra Nova. Nordisk did bother to put pull tags on the zips and they even put a decent pocket on the inside – woop woop. The little clips that tie back the door and attach the inner to the outer are positive and easy to use with chilly hands and the guy line pegging points are nice metal, durable rings, little points that keep me happy.

nordisk telemark tent, mountain leader

Somewhere in the Moelwyns, standard ML territory!

It must have some downsides though? It’s too early to comment on the durability of the fabric, but it is pretty thin so we’ll have to see about that, but a lot of users have complained about the amount of condensation that builds up inside over night and I’ve had mixed experiences of this. I’ve had a couple of nights where I’ve had far more condensation than I expected, despite there being a gentle breeze that I thought would move some air through the tent. I’ve had other nights which weren’t wildly different weather where I’ve had virtually zero condensation – the weather must have been a bit different but I’ve not been scientific on this one I’m afraid.

Like the Terra Nova, it’s a doddle to pitch, the single pole slides easily into the sleeve and folds down nice and small for when it’s in your bag, the Nordisk can be pitched with just 4 pegs. You can use the mini end poles to create a pole for the porch, but I’ve not felt the need for this and probably never will. The inner floor is on a slider so you can make the porch a little bigger and the inner a little narrower, or vice versa depending on your preference. Even with the inner at max theres enough space for your pack, boots, and of course a Cocker Spaniel! Whilst the tent feels more spacious when you’re lying down, the ten centimetres less head space is noticeable and I wouldn’t want to spend a long time living in this tent, but that’s not really what it’ll be used for, it’s an arrive late, leave early type tent. There is also a two person version which does give some more height – as well as a bigger footprint of course.

nordisk telemark tent review

The little bear!

As well as the two person version, there’s also an Ultra Lightweight version, costing £495 ish and weighing in at 770grams, I decided it wasn’t worth the extra cost to me.

At the moment I’m really happy with the Nordisk and it’s my go to tent for Mountain Leader duties, I am slightly concerned about how the condensation will play out and I am considering a slightly bigger tent for when the weather becomes a bit more wintery – something a bit more stable with more space to sit up and have the dog inside, maybe something like a Terra Nova Superlite but I don’t think they make them any more.

For more details on the Nordisk Telemark, take a look at the Nordisk site.

As always, check out the Facebook, Instagram and Twitter feeds for what we’ve been up to lately!

I was recently sent a couple of bits of kit to test, a jacket and a tent by a relatively new British company called OEX. I didn’t know a huge amount about the brand to be honest other than it is sold through Go Outdoors and a D of E group I worked with last year was using OEX tents, which had performed admirably in some pretty brutal weather.

When the parcel arrived I sort of knew what to expect from the tent as I’d checked it out online, the Lynx EV 1 is a one man tent costing £169.99 (if you’ve got a Go Outdoors card) and perhaps more importantly weighs in at 1.65kgs. The jacket however was a mystery, I can’t say I was expecting great things but I was pleasantly surprised when I got it out, it looks smart!

OEX Lynx EV 1 Tent
Let me start by saying I’m a bit spoilt by currently owning a Terra Nova Laser Comp as my lightweight tent, which retails at over £300, but can be had for significantly less. I’ve written a brief bit about this tent before (kit blog here), even though it’s the tent I love to hate, it’s still the tent I reach for though when I’m camping on my own for work due to the fact it weighs less than 1kg. So, the Lynx costs a lot less, weighs a bit more, but is it any good. Well yes, it’s really good.

Putting the tent up is really straight forward, it’s a one pole affair (decent Yunan T6 aluminium, better than most), but it is a funky pole with four branches which makes quite a stable frame. The inner clips onto the poles with some fairly naff looking plastic clips, I’m a little dubious about how long they’ll last, then you chuck the siliconised outer on which has a few little tie in points to attach it along the pole. The tie in points are pretty fiddly with cold hands after a day out in the cold, as I found out working on a Mountain Leader training. On the same ML training it was pretty windy overnight but the tent wasn’t flappy or unstable so big plus points there. Inner pitching first tents tend to be more stable, with the disadvantage of the inner getting wet if you’re not quick in poor weather but personally I’ve never had a problem with this, just be quick!. A nice touch is that it comes with a proper dry bag which is actually big enough to easily take the tent without a battle.

At 6’3″ I fit in it comfortably, although getting in and out of the entrance is a bit of a squeeze, I can however sit up at the front end of the tent for cooking and eating etc. The porch is a lttle on the small side, once your pack and boots are in there, you’re not left with much room for cooking and the porch has one of those silly door mat type things which I find pretty pointless. Inside the roomy interior you get a pocket to tuck the door into (simple but really good idea) and a couple of other decent sized ones (which is better than my Terra Nova which for some silly reason has none!)

I’d be more than happy to spend more time in this tent, I guess it’s main competition is some thing like the Wild Country Zephyros which costs a bit less and weighs a touch less with more porch space, but it isn’t as stable. I see a lot of candidates with those tents on ML courses.

Mountain Leader Instructor Snowdonia OEX Tent

OEX Hydra Stretch 2.5 Jacket
So in a similar vein to the tent, my normal go to jacket is a Patagonia Super Alpine which retails at, wait for it, £450. Now these jackets are aimed at wildly different markets, but I use my kit year round and all over the world so I expect high standards. And this is why the OEX one has been such a surprise! It retails at £75, yep that’s correct £75, without even considering it’s performance it looks like a jacket costing a lot more.

My test jacket was a medium (weighing 370g) and it was perfect in the body fitting my athletic/skinny frame, but was a little short in the arms, I do often have to compromise somewhere in terms of fit though. Stretchy fabric, two big chest pockets that easily swallow a map and pit zips that do a good job of venting excess heat are great, the hood though wasn’t any good for me as a climber and mountaineer though as firstly it doesn’t fit over a helmet properly and secondly the draw cord adjusters for it are not retained so fling around in windy conditions. When one of those flicks you in the face it feels like your going to die (well, nearly).

I’ve had this jacket out in some honking conditions and it’s done really well, it seems just as waterproof as my Gore Tex Pro kit, but doesn’t seem to breathe quite as well as I expected. For me this is a great, lightweight hill walking jacket or to have stowed in my rucksack when I’m running rock climbing courses, it’s comfortable to wear, looks good and keeps the weather out. Seems like a bargain to me.

OEX jacket mountaineering instructor north wales

To see what we’ve been up to lately, check out the Facebook page and follow us on Instagram.

Go Outdoors – OEX page

Photos by me, or courtesy of Ilana Miller.

Loads more pictures…

OEX lynx tent snowdonia mountain instructor 5

Neat adjusters, which are glove friendly

OEX lynx tent snowdonia mountain instructor 2

The pole hooks

OEX lynx tent snowdonia mountain instructor 1

Putting it up for the first time in Cwm Glas

OEX lynx tent snowdonia mountain instructor

Organised mess

OEX lynx tent snowdonia mountain instructor 3

Nice streamlined shape

OEX lynx tent snowdonia mountain instructor 5

Mountain Leader expedition

OEX lynx tent snowdonia mountain instructor 4

OEX Stretch jacket snowdonia mountain instructor

Night nav on a Mountain Leader training